close_menu
close-popup
image-popup

Available languages:
close-popup
Paypal
Credit card

Privacy policy

subscribe
Current issues

Repercussions of Daraa Airstrikes

Press Review [shutterstock.com]

Press Review 7.5.18

Last update: 2018-07-05 11:04:04

As Assad-led airstrikes continue, Daraa civilians flee the Southern city of Syria. Hussein Akoush and Elizabeth Hagedorn of the Guardian detail the experience of Syrian families’ departure, as well the surrounding countries’ responses to the influx in migrants. 

 

Iran’s interest in Syria and it’s steaks in the country hinder conflict resolution in the region, according the U.S., Israel, and the Gulf states. Marwan Kabalan explains the growing pressure for Iran to withdraw its forces from Syria in Al Jazeera.

 

Iraq’s Christian leader Patriarch Louis Raphael I Sako was newly appointed a cardinal by the Catholic Pope on June 28th. This new appointment will allow the Christian community of Iraq a voice in the decision for the next pope, as well as a chance to contribute to the international faith community, according to Saad Salloum of Al-Monitor.

 

“Your wife is a practicing Muslim, and your name is Jihad.” Rebecca Seales interviews a handful of Muslim men with the name “Jihad” to discuss beards, airport security, and the stigma that is associated with Islam in the West. Read about her the men's’ experiences on BBC news here.

 

Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani called for help from European governments and others to stand up to U.S. policies against Tehran Wednesday. In a conference in Vienna on July 4th, Rouhani claimed that U.S. sanctions against Tehran are “a crime and an error,” according to Reuters.

 

As the ISIS caliphate “collapsed” under a military campaign led by Kurdish militias backed by the U.S. many Syrian men were killed or captured, leaving wives and children in camps, unwanted by anyone. With the stigma of being part of ISIS, but without any plan set in place to be incorporated into society, the once-housewives and their children are now being lumped into the same categories as jihadist fighters, explains Ben Hubbard of the New York Times. Despite the lack of plans for integration, projects are beginning to take shape that help these women and children to regain a sense of community and support.