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Who are the White Helmets?

Press Review [shutterstock.com]

Press Review 7.23.18

Last update: 2018-07-23 12:04:43

The Syrian Civil Defense, also known as the White Helmets, have rescued thousands since the start of the Syrian war in 2011. Israeli and Jordanian officials, backed by the West, conducted operations to help the White Helmets and their families reach safety in Jordan on Sunday. Learn more about the White Helmets, and how their life saving volunteer organization began through Ben Hubbard’s piece for the New York Times.

 

US President Donald Trump and Iran President Hassan Rouhani have exchanged threats over trade. Trump tweeted that Iran “will suffer consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered before” if the US is threatened by his trade laws. In May, the US left a deal that aimed to curb Iranian nuclear facilities. Read more about why the US left, as well as the US’ plans for a “new deal” with Iran from the BBC here. 

 

Gathering together in an abandoned suburb in Cairo once a week, Egyptian women come together to practice parkour, challenging the countries conservative social norms in the process. Parkour, taking its name from the French ‘parcours,’ which means course or route, focuses on building upper body strength and different methods of navigating surroundings while running, jumping and climbing around buildings and terrain. It is uncommon for women to play sports on the streets in Egypt, explain Reuters’ staff, which is why the movement of women practicing parkour in outdoor parks is garnering attention.

 

Charles Clarke, a former education secretary of the UK, and Linda Woodhead, a sociology professor in England discuss the fluctuating religious landscape of the UK, explaining, “We are living through the single biggest change in the religious and cultural landscape in Britain for centuries, even millennia…” Learn more about their current ideas to introduce a uniform curriculum of “religion, beliefs, and values” into UK state-funded schools from the Economist, here.